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#homesweethomenc : part 5

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the day started with a genealogy tour and checking out some new writing software
on daddy's apple, fried eggs, some Ava-dog walking... and doggie goldfish feeding
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my dad has been doing a great deal of genealogy research over the past few years, and was
eager to take us on a tour of some of the locations he has traced our family roots, so we
drove south through the country, and through land that was owned by our ancestors who
were influential in settling the area, crossing into "the dark corner" area of South Carolina
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we stopped at the last covered bridge in existence in the state of South Carolina
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it is neat to think that my ancestors would have traveled across this bridge, and now my parents
have had the opportunity to cross it holding the little hand of their family's newest generation
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of course, our genealogy tour included a trip to a grave yard where there were
plenty of headstones with one of our family names, meaning more reasearch for my
daddy to do, Rufus and Omie were my great-great-grandparents (right, daddy?)
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we then drove back north crossing back into North Carolina and into the county where
my parents first met, and the location of the hospital I was born in
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this home, named 7 Hearths, was not originally located here, but was moved to this
site years ago, and my dad has identified it as the home of one of our ancestors
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this park is right across the street from the home's current location, and hello, look
at those mountains in the background... it's funny how when I lived in the area I never
really noticed these beautiful mountains, but living in such a flat area of Virginia,
every little peep of a mountain view grabbed my attention as we were driving

we then drove along the "snake roads" (my daddy's grandfather told them as children
that mountain roads were mapped out by snakes because a snake is always going to
find the easiest route up the mountain, that is why the roads wind, curve, and turn
like a snake - haha!) toward the lake, more on that in the next post...

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